Chinese Red Tea Super Sampler --  December Tea Club Box Left-Overs
Chinese Red Tea Super Sampler --  December Tea Club Box Left-Overs
Chinese Red Tea Super Sampler --  December Tea Club Box Left-Overs
Chinese Red Tea Super Sampler --  December Tea Club Box Left-Overs
Chinese Red Tea Super Sampler --  December Tea Club Box Left-Overs
Chinese Red Tea Super Sampler --  December Tea Club Box Left-Overs

Chinese Red Tea Super Sampler -- December Tea Club Box Left-Overs

One River Tea

Regular price $48.00 Sale

This is a big box that aims to connect boutique consumers abroad with a rich variety of middle grade red teas from across China. It was originally only availible to our Tea Club members, but is now open to the general public. It does not feature the Lichuanhong that was sent to tea club members.

Tea

Aroma

Taste

Leaves

Misc.

Lapsang

Souchong

Citrus; bubblegum

Neutral; unsweet: not bitter.

Dark “narly” curls.

-Balls of Hao(down) present in the bag.

Osmanthus

Overwhelming

floral smell.

Overwhelming;

floral taste

Visible flowers.

-Pleasant throat sensation

Qimen

Wet hay;

sweet potato.

Earthy; mild bitterness

Spiral-curls;

visible Hao.

 

Laos Dianhong

Wood

Chalky; thick mouthfeel.

Thick stems;

larger leaves.

 

Jinjunmei

Sweet potato

Sweet potato; fantastic Huigan.

Very small;

golden.

-Not grown is historic growing area.

 

This box offers a very unique overview of Chinese red tea. The Osmanthus black tea in this set hits the classic mark, but the complete leaves of this sample do put it above some of the stuff on the international market. The Qimen in this set is nontraditional in its spiral shape, but still representative of mid-market Qimen. The Dianhong and Jinjunmei in this sample are unusual for their respective origin points. The former was produced from ancient trees in Northern Laos, a new frontier in Dianhong production; and the latter was made in Enshi, hundreds of miles from the officially designated growing area. Neither technically satisfy the government definitions of these teas, but they are both nonetheless delicious and unique. Almost as tasty is the Lapsang Souchong in this sampler. It is an excellent example of  contemporary Lapsang’s new neutral flavor. This tea is neither especially bitter nor especially sweet, nor does it taste anything remotely like the smokey tea of questionable provenance that can still be purchased in grocery stores abroad. We think at least some of these teas will find a place in the heart of international boutique consumers.

Click here to see the comprehensive educational document that was shared with tea club members.